Standard dental procedures

Dental procedures for our pets can be confusing. This is because we mistakenly identify or relate animal dentistry to the care we receive from our dentists. Vast differences exist between proper dental care for pets and dentistry in humans. This information is designed to help you understand what goes on when we perform dental procedures on your pet and help you make valuable choices that will improve the longevity and quality of your pet’s life. We are always available to discuss your pet’s dental health issues. We have numerous models and photos to help illustrate dental procedures. Dr. Kimberlin and his staff are happy to share them with you. The most noticeable difference between human and animal dentistry is the need for general anesthesia in all procedures. Because of this difference, modern canine and feline dental care can be divided into 3 phases: Preanesthetic exam and work up Dental procedure Post-anesthetic care and home dental care A routine dental prophy (prophylaxis), sometimes referred to as “teeth cleaning”, is performed to prevent dental disease in pets and humans. This is recommended yearly or as needed for pets that have good in home care and proper diet. This is what the human dental hygenist does for you. Unfortunately, most often when animals are presented for a prophy dental disease is already in the advanced stages of disease.. Due to breed and size differences there is a wide variation in dental health among pets. Gingivitis, loose teeth, abcessed teeth and periodontal disease are common findings. The severity of these conditions cannot be fully assessed while the patient is awake - general anesthesia is required for a complete oral examination and radiographs (x-rays). Periodontal diseaseGingivitis and periodontal disease, shown at right, is the most common disease of small animals. The photo shows severe periodontal disease with bone loss, gum recession, and periodontal pockets upon probing. Arrows indicate calculus and exudate at the gum line. Your pet’s health and quality of life depend on preventative veterinary care and good home care. We want to work as a team with you to promote a long and happy life for your pet. Let’s go through the normal procedure for professional dental care in pets.

What we will do:

Preanesthetic exam and work up Dental procedure Post-anesthetic care and home care How much does all of this cost?  

Preanesthetic exam and work up

We will examine your pet from nose to tail for any abnormalities. This includes listening to the heart and lungs. If any abnormalities are noted, we will discuss them fully with you and possibly recommend other tests to determine the extent of the problems. This may include blood tests, x rays, and urinalysis. If your pet is determined to be at risk due to health issues, the procedure will be postponed until these are addressed. An intravenous catheter is placed in your pet’s leg before anesthesia. This maintains adequate venous access during the procedure and allows fluids and injections to be given without further stress to your pet. A preanesthetic injection is given to help sedate your pet, provide pain control and reduce nausea and salivation. General anesthesia is induced. Anesthesia is maintained by the same gas anesthetics used in human hospitals. We use modern and safe protocols that allow pets to wake up minutes after the procedure is finished. Pulse oximetry and cardiac and respiratory monitors are used to insure safety. Body temperature is monitored and maintained throughout the procedure. Intravenous fluids will be administered during anesthesia to maintain blood pressure and assure proper hydration. With anesthesia induced we are ready for the dental procedure.

Dental procedure

We will remove all tartar from the teeth above and below the gum (subgingival) using both ultrasonic and hand scaling tools. After the tartar is removed, we will use dental probes to determine if there are periodontal pockets, which indicate loss of attachment of gum and bone to the tooth. If periodontal pockets are present, dental x-rays will be taken to determine if the tooth can be salvaged with periodontal or endodontic therapy. This is a digital dental x-ray demonstrating bone loss and periodontal pocketing, which have allowed bacteria to reach the root and cause an abcessed tooth. Greater than 50% of the normal bone structure has been resorbed. These teeth can not be salvaged and must be extracted. If the tooth can not be salvaged without causing pain or disease, it will be extracted. When painful procedures will be performed, a local nerve block is administered to control pain. Extraction sites will have a bone replacement material placed in the socket and the gum sutured over it to allow rapid healing and prevent pain when eating. If the tooth can be saved we will try to keep it in use. At the end of the dental procedure we will polish the teeth using flouride polishing pastes to brighten and smooth tooth surfaces. We will then flush and rinse the teeth using an antibacterial rinse.

Post-anesthetic care and home care

After the procedure, antibiotics will be prescribed, if indicated, and additional pain medications will be sent home if needed. A home care regimen will be recommended to help prevent future dental disease. This will include brushing, proper dry diet, tooth gels and tartar reducing chews. This is where your part becomes important! Dental Discharge & Home Care Instruction Sheet Depending upon the severity of disease present, we will schedule follow up exams to safeguard against future problems and help you maintain a healthy happy pet!

How much does all of this cost?

Generally fees for routine small animal dental cleaning range from $300 to $350 depending on the severity of disease present. This includes anesthesia and radiographs as well as cleaning. Advanced disease may require additional procedures including, but not limited to, periodontal surgery, extractions, and bone augmentation and therefore incur additional cost. Oral surgery, root canal therapy and crown application will require fees in excess of the routine costs just described. We will be glad to discuss any of our fees with you prior to dental treatment. If you provide a phone number where you can be reached during the procedure, we can call you for authorization of any additional care deemed necessary. Any procedures may be scheduled for later times; however, this will require additional anesthesia and expense.
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Northeast Texas Veterinary Dental Center

8414 Wesley Street Greenville, TX 75402 903-454-1563 info@crossroadsvetclinic.com
Periodontal disease in a dog Dr, Kimberlin working on a cat X-ray showing bone loss
©  Copyright © 2002- 2016 All rights reserved   This page designed and maintained by Word Works

Standard

dental

procedures

Dental procedures for our pets can be confusing. This is because we mistakenly identify or relate animal dentistry to the care we receive from our dentists. Vast differences exist between proper dental care for pets and dentistry in humans. This information is designed to help you understand what goes on when we perform dental procedures on your pet and help you make valuable choices that will improve the longevity and quality of your pet’s life. We are always available to discuss your pet’s dental health issues. We have numerous models and photos to help illustrate dental procedures. Dr. Kimberlin and his staff are happy to share them with you. The most noticeable difference between human and animal dentistry is the need for general anesthesia in all procedures. Because of this difference, modern canine and feline dental care can be divided into 3 phases: Preanesthetic exam and work up Dental procedure Post-anesthetic care and home dental care A routine dental prophy (prophylaxis), sometimes referred to as “teeth cleaning”, is performed to prevent dental disease in pets and humans. This is recommended yearly or as needed for pets that have good in home care and proper diet. This is what the human dental hygenist does for you. Unfortunately, most often when animals are presented for a prophy dental disease is already in the advanced stages of disease.. Due to breed and size differences there is a wide variation in dental health among pets. Gingivitis, loose teeth, abcessed teeth and periodontal disease are common findings. The severity of these conditions cannot be fully assessed while the patient is awake - general anesthesia is required for a complete oral examination and radiographs (x-rays). Periodontal diseaseGingivitis and periodontal disease, shown at right, is the most common disease of small animals. The photo shows severe periodontal disease with bone loss, gum recession, and periodontal pockets upon probing. Arrows indicate calculus and exudate at the gum line. Your pet’s health and quality of life depend on preventative veterinary care and good home care. We want to work as a team with you to promote a long and happy life for your pet. Let’s go through the normal procedure for professional dental care in pets.

What we will do:

Preanesthetic exam and work up Dental procedure Post-anesthetic care and home care How much does all of this cost?  

Preanesthetic exam and work up

We will examine your pet from nose to tail for any abnormalities. This includes listening to the heart and lungs. If any abnormalities are noted, we will discuss them fully with you and possibly recommend other tests to determine the extent of the problems. This may include blood tests, x rays, and urinalysis. If your pet is determined to be at risk due to health issues, the procedure will be postponed until these are addressed. An intravenous catheter is placed in your pet’s leg before anesthesia. This maintains adequate venous access during the procedure and allows fluids and injections to be given without further stress to your pet. A preanesthetic injection is given to help sedate your pet, provide pain control and reduce nausea and salivation. General anesthesia is induced. Anesthesia is maintained by the same gas anesthetics used in human hospitals. We use modern and safe protocols that allow pets to wake up minutes after the procedure is finished. Pulse oximetry and cardiac and respiratory monitors are used to insure safety. Body temperature is monitored and maintained throughout the procedure. Intravenous fluids will be administered during anesthesia to maintain blood pressure and assure proper hydration. With anesthesia induced we are ready for the dental procedure.

Dental procedure

We will remove all tartar from the teeth above and below the gum (subgingival) using both ultrasonic and hand scaling tools. After the tartar is removed, we will use dental probes to determine if there are periodontal pockets, which indicate loss of attachment of gum and bone to the tooth. If periodontal pockets are present, dental x-rays will be taken to determine if the tooth can be salvaged with periodontal or endodontic therapy. This is a digital dental x-ray demonstrating bone loss and periodontal pocketing, which have allowed bacteria to reach the root and cause an abcessed tooth. Greater than 50% of the normal bone structure has been resorbed. These teeth can not be salvaged and must be extracted. If the tooth can not be salvaged without causing pain or disease, it will be extracted. When painful procedures will be performed, a local nerve block is administered to control pain. Extraction sites will have a bone replacement material placed in the socket and the gum sutured over it to allow rapid healing and prevent pain when eating. If the tooth can be saved we will try to keep it in use. At the end of the dental procedure we will polish the teeth using flouride polishing pastes to brighten and smooth tooth surfaces. We will then flush and rinse the teeth using an antibacterial rinse.

Post-anesthetic care and home care

After the procedure, antibiotics will be prescribed, if indicated, and additional pain medications will be sent home if needed. A home care regimen will be recommended to help prevent future dental disease. This will include brushing, proper dry diet, tooth gels and tartar reducing chews. This is where your part becomes important! Dental Discharge & Home Care Instruction Sheet Depending upon the severity of disease present, we will schedule follow up exams to safeguard against future problems and help you maintain a healthy happy pet!

How much does all of this cost?

Generally fees for routine small animal dental cleaning range from $300 to $350 depending on the severity of disease present. This includes anesthesia and radiographs as well as cleaning. Advanced disease may require additional procedures including, but not limited to, periodontal surgery, extractions, and bone augmentation and therefore incur additional cost. Oral surgery, root canal therapy and crown application will require fees in excess of the routine costs just described. We will be glad to discuss any of our fees with you prior to dental treatment. If you provide a phone number where you can be reached during the procedure, we can call you for authorization of any additional care deemed necessary. Any procedures may be scheduled for later times; however, this will require additional anesthesia and expense.

Northeast Texas Veterinary

Dental Center

8414 Wesley Street Greenville, TX 75402 903.454-1563 info@crossroadsvetclinic.com Appointments:    9 a.m.– 5 p.m. Monday-Friday Open for animal drop-off    at 7:30 a.m.